Tag Archives: Advocacy

Defending Science and Scientific Integrity in the Age of Trump: a Session at the 2017 AAAS Meeting

(Note the title and content of this blog post are a reflection on a session at this years AAAS meeting and not an official position of the Academics for the Future of Science.) The message of keeping science as a top priority for the U.S. was evident from many conversations at the 2017 American Association […]

A Personal Perspective on Science; the AAAS President’s Address at the 2017 AAAS Meeting

As an introduction to this session, Dr. Geraldine Richmond (Presidential Chair in Science and Professor of Chemistry, University of Oregon) first spoke of the AAAS meeting as being an interdisciplinary meeting, and of global nature. To this latter point, Richmond‘s assertion that “science depends on openness, transparency, and the freeflow of ideas and people” is […]

Naomi Oreskes: The Scientist as Sentinel – a Talk at the 2017 AAAS Meeting

At this year’s AAAS meeting Dr. Naomi Oreskes, Professor of the History of Science at Harvard University, gave one of the meeting’s most inspirational talks; “The Scientist as Sentinel.” This title is in itself an interesting idea. If we think about the definition of sentinel, which is “a soldier or guard whose job is to […]

The NIH Grant Support Index: Help for Young Scientists or Collaboration-Killer?

The National Institutes of Health recently released a proposal to cap researchers’ “Grant Support Index”. In effect, each grant type counts for a certain number of “GSI points”, with the R01 (the flagship independent-investigator award) counting for 7 points. The full scale is described in NIH’s GSI blog post linked above, and the rationale for […]

Now that we have Marched for Science, what’s next for science advocacy in Boston?

          It is an unprecedented time for science enthusiasm. Last fall science was barely mentioned in the election. We know because we wrote a blog post about it and had a hard time digging up any mention of science by the candidates. Now over a million people marched for for science […]

How Early Career Scientists Can Serve Science Through Policy: a Workshop at the 2017 AAAS Meeting

Early career researchers aspire to engage with society while still pursuing their research careers. They may engage by contributing directly to policy decisions or by becoming community advocates. This type of engagement is critical for making the public understand what science is and what scientists do. At the same time, it gives junior scientists multiple […]

Why should you march for science?

Update: AFS are officially partnered with the March for Science Boston as well as the National March for Science, join us at the march and come find our table on Boston Common on April 22 or check for updates to our Facebook group to meet up with us in D.C. If you’re not in the Boston or D.C. area, find […]

Meeting with Representative Lance, U.S. Representative for New Jersey's 7th congressional district

What it’s like to lobby for science

The fact that consistent funding for biomedical research has decreased over the years is known to everyone who works in basic science. Indeed, it is a reason for many to leave the field altogether and explore other options.  I wondered if there was something I could actively do to understand how funding at a federal […]

AFS interviewed Dr. Reba Bandyopadhyay, AAAS policy fellow

AAAS Science and Technology policy fellowships provide opportunities to scientists and engineers to learn first-hand about policymaking and contribute their knowledge and analytical skills in the policy realm by serving in the federal government. Disclaimer from Reba: The views and opinions expressed here are entirely my own and should not be construed to reflect or represent […]