Author Archives: academicsforthefutureofscience

Why should you march for science?

Update: AFS are officially partnered with the March for Science Boston as well as the National March for Science, join us at the march and come find our table on Boston Common on April 22 or check for updates to our Facebook group to meet up with us in D.C. If you’re not in the Boston or D.C. area, find […]

Real world evidence and the 21st Century Cures Act

Late last year, US Congress passed the 21st Century Cures Act,* a bipartisan bill that would increase funding for medical research, reevaluate the current mental health systems in the US and enhance the regulatory requirements for pharmaceuticals and medical devices. I am compelled to write a piece on a very interesting amendment to the law: […]

AFS NEWS 01/20/16 – PRESIDENTIAL INAUGURATION DAY SCIENCE POLICY ROUNDUP

On the day of President Trump’s inauguration, we thought it would be good to highlight some of the key issues from the last week that could impact the future of science and research in the US over the course of the next administration. Trump nominees discussing science Over the last week, Donald Trump’s choices for key […]

How can young trainees improve the scientific enterprise?

The scientific enterprise is at a crossroads. More and more young trainees are leaving academia every day. This is a very present phenomenon, which leaves me wondering what will happen to the biomedical research enterprise in the future. Will it become more sustainable because there are fewer researchers to support, or will it fall apart […]

The Federal Budget Process: a critical time for the future of scientific research

Progress in scientific research depends on reliable and consistent funding. One of the worst things that can happen to federally funded research programs is uncertainty over funding levels or even worse, a government shutdown. In order to try and prevent such an event from occurring, we are asking you to contact your local representatives and […]

Cartoon a paper: making old mice young again

What are the new cool things happening in science? We nominate recent papers that are particularly cool to be made into cartoons illustrating the main findings. Use #cartoonapaper on twitter to nominate a paper to become a cartoon.

AFS NEWS ROUNDUP 07/18/16 – REGULAR UPDATES ON SCIENCE FUNDING, POLICY, AND RESEARCH NEWS

NIH funding boost from House Appropriations Committee   Last week, the House Appropriations Committee approved its Labor, Health and Human Services (LHHS) bill that includes a 3.9% increase in funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to a total of $33.3 billion. The Senate approved its LHHS bill in June and both bills will […]

AFS NEWS ROUNDUP 06/20/16 – REGULAR UPDATES ON SCIENCE FUNDING, POLICY, AND RESEARCH NEWS

$2 billion boost for NIH in Senate spending bill A Senate spending panel has approved a $2 billion (6.2%) increase in the National Institutes of Health budget. A large proportion of this increase is for specific initiatives, such as Alzheimer’s research and brain-mapping projects. While this news is promising, the prospects for bills being approved by Congress […]

Meeting with Representative Lance, U.S. Representative for New Jersey's 7th congressional district

What it’s like to lobby for science

The fact that consistent funding for biomedical research has decreased over the years is known to everyone who works in basic science. Indeed, it is a reason for many to leave the field altogether and explore other options.  I wondered if there was something I could actively do to understand how funding at a federal […]

Brexit: why Britain exiting the EU is (probably) bad news for science

With the upcoming referendum on UK membership in the EU, British citizen and MIT postdoctoral fellow Peter Harvey discusses his views on the debate and what it could mean for UK science. Note, all views expressed are the personal opinions of the author (a UK scientist living in the US) and don’t represent an official stance from […]